Deferred money is an issue in David Wright contract negotiations

In a report to the New York Post, an industry source with knowledge of the negotiations has told Mike Puma deferred money is an issue between the New York Mets and David Wright.  According to Puma:

Photo taken by Michael Baron

“The $119 million-129 million the Mets are willing to pay Wright for seven years (making the deal $135M-$145M counting the 2013 season) beginning in 2014 could translate into significantly less in present-day dollars, depending upon how much is deferred.

The Mets’ initial offer to Wright was six years and $100 million, but the team increased both the length of contract and dollar amount in recent days. The source said Santana’s franchise record $137.5 million deal is a “benchmark” Wright and his agents are clearly pursuing.”

After reports surfaced yesterday afternoon about a potential seven-year extension, Wright’s agent Seth Levinson told MLBTradeRumors.com he does not anticipate an agreement between the Mets and Wright any time soon.

“Discussions with the Mets are ongoing,” Levinson told MLB Trade Rumors.  “We don’t anticipate a deal any time soon. However, things can always change. I will not characterize the negotiations or comment on the accuracy or inaccuracy of what is being reported.”

Wright also described the reports as “inaccurate,” according to the website, saying:

“I have said from Day 1 that I want to play my entire career with the New York Mets. I remain hopeful that goal can be achieved. However, I am disappointed by the reports that I have read today which are inaccurate.

Well. This was a crappy way to start the day.  I have to be honest, this concerns me.  After reading Wright’s comments, it makes me believe the Mets purposely leaked the numbers on this deal to put the onus on David.  As Jay wrote yesterday:

The contract, from a practical standpoint, is ridiculous. These lengthy deals never work out as far as performance goes, but Wright is the face of the franchise and in New York a big market team should be able to afford to overpay someone with Wright’s resume both on and off the field. All this goes with the assumption that Wright does in fact want to stay in New York and this offer, if accurate, will certainly test that premise.

EmailFacebookShare

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments